Friday, November 27, 2009

Libertarian News (11/27/09)


A Libertarian Viewpoint
This new book comes to us from the pen of Douglas N. Merritt, a longtime Libertarian from Kansas who has distilled years of essays, speeches, and columns into a 460-page tome on Libertarian politics.


Is libertarianism the ideology of the future?
"Is libertarianism growing around the world in spite of the political dominance of its antithesis, big government socialistic type regimes everywhere? [Full Article]"


Liberty and Children
This libertarian asks a provocative and interesting question as an example of a classic libertarian problem- children, parenthood, and the state.


Where was the Libertarian Party?
"Election Day 2009 has come and gone. Relatively speaking, this election was as insignificant as any off-year election is, as opposed to a mid-term election, but it still could have been an important year for the Libertarian Party, if we had simply bothered to show up. There were six elections / ballot initiatives which could have possibly been affected by the Libertarian Party… if we actually had a long-term strategic plan. As it is, some things happened for which it is notable that the LP had no role in. In no particular order, let’s look at where we could have had real impacts this year. [Full Article]"


So Who Is Mean-Spirited?
"I have long been intrigued that when conservatives and libertarians frankly speak their minds regarding the threat our nation is facing from political forces on the far left that they are almost routinely called 'mean-spirited' (and if that doesn't shut them up, their sanity is called into question). [Full Article]"


Climate Researchers Target Cato Institute Fellow
Apparently in the recently hacked e-mails of a prominent climate research center, there are attacks on Patrick Michaels, a senior fellow at the libertarian Cato Institute. He also sounds off on the controversy in this article.


The Orphan of the American Political Spectrum
"For a host of reasons, however, libertarianism in the US today is politically parentless, and largely unrepresented in most of our major cultural and educational institutions, a socio-political orphan. It's an odd state of affairs, and unfortunate as well. [Full Article]"